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I remember when I arrived in Australia,  all those decades ago, I had an accent that I would chuckle at today.

Now I speak with an accent that is proudly Australian.

I was a kid from Europe whose parents barely spoke English.  We were almost like kids that had been adopted by parents that we did not know and did not understand. 

And I learned ballroom dancing

Sometimes we need to break the rules.

I learned the basics from my parents and could at least get by with things like a greeting, a farewell or an " I feel sick " or such like. 

Until I went to school, I spoke like my parents, and over time, I didn't even realize that I was changing. My voice changed and my parents looked at me with bewilderment because I was speaking like an Aussie.

My vowels changed. My words changed. I was changing. Things were different for me.

I came home from school and Mum and Dad heard me speak and, instead of speaking my " native " language, I was running in and yelling and laughing and using words that I had learned at school.

 
I began to understand things like " bugger off your moron " and " shit, that's bloody funny. " 


I told my parents to " bugger off ". Which I got away with because my parents had no idea what I said.

I learned that my parents had no idea what I was saying. Which was rather handy at times. Until they found out, and that was a different kettle of fish, as the saying goes. 

I learned that they were lacking in my knowledge of Australia. I soon knew more than they did. It was in school that I became an Australian. I had not thought about it until now. all these decades later. 

If our schools are changing, would I be the well adjusted, God fearing and patriotic Australian I am today?

 

Probably not. I would be a migrant child embracing my " difference " and never knowing the joy it is to be an Australian. 

 

Had it not been for me being thrown in at the deep end and immersed in AUSTRALIA, I would have never known the joy I have each Australia Day and ANZAC Day. I am Australian.

  

I can remember when I was not Australian. But I became one. And it makes me proud. 

 

I just wish that other Australians could embrace the feeling of pride I have when I can say that.

 It is who brings us up, rears us and nurtures us that matters.

Australia did that and does that. We embrace each other. The land that is us. 

 

 

My birth mother is someone to whom I am incredibly grateful. My home country. But I will always love the mother that reared me and gave me the love. the values and the pride I feel today.

I will always honour my heritage. But, to me, the Mother I owe the greatest gratitude is the Mother that gave me the ability to say today that I am Australian. 

Had I not been taught to celebrate my diversity and " Birth Mother " I would never have been able to embrace the hug that Australia and Australians have given me over the decades I have been here.

Australia is my adopted Mother and I love her so much for the warm hug she gave me when I came here 68 years ago. 

When I see people like Lidia Thorpe calling themselves Australians and telling me and others that we are bad people, all I can say is NO!

 

This world wide phenomenon of hatred against anything that they do not agree with has to stop.

I love my country.

My Mother.

Surely, it is the same for the Americans who came from other Nations?  The people, like me, who came to a new country seeking hope?

I remember when we cared about each other and politics was nothing to do with our way of life. 

Why is it that we are told that we are bad for having sought refuge and embraced our new mother?

Lidia Thorpe seems to think that Australia is only for people of indigenous blood. I must ask how much is this possible when she has mixed blood?

 

She would not exist had it not been for her "white  blood. " 

Surely, we can move on from this? Are we surely not the same people?

 Because I remember when we were good people and the idea that we were divided was a thing of the never never. 

Before politics stepped in. 

 Yes, I remember when we were Australian. 

And " Strictly Ballroom " proved that we don't have to follow someone else's rules.

 

 

 

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