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As Empire Day, 24th May, approaches it is timely that we remember one of Australia’s greatest and mostly forgotten sporting heroes. Les Darcy, The Maitland Wonder.

Les Darcy is a name that will not ring a bell for most of you unless you are a keen follower of boxing or you have your roots in the Maitland, NSW, area.

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In just a few months, the World Health Organization received approximately 20,000 reports of new eye disorders that occurred post covid-19 vaccination. These reports include 303 cases of blindness and 1,625 cases of visual impairment! The European drug monitoring agency had never recorded such a severe spike in eye injuries until after the experimental vaccines were launched. These reports were collected by VigiBase and analyzed by the Uppsala Monitoring Centre in Uppsalla, Sweden.

About half of the new eye disorders were additionally reported to the U.K.’s Yellow Card adverse event reporting system, which was set up to monitor the influx of adverse events that were anticipated during this live, experimental vaccine study. Back in 2020, the vaccine makers had already entered into liability-free contracts with governments around the world. This has enabled mass vaccine injury with no recourse or accountability and set up the framework for a historic, worldwide holocaust.

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The Battle of the Coral Sea is regarded by some as the action that saved Australia in WW2. That is an over-simplistic view in my opinion. It was certainly a major factor in turning the tide against Japan but it was one of a conglomerate of successful campaigns which, together, stopped their advance in the Pacific.

The Battle of the Coral Sea was fought between the Japanese Navy and the combined naval forces of the Allies but heavily dominated by the US carrier based task force. Together with the success of the Australians at Milne Bay and the Kokoda Track these three events were instrumental in the eventual defeat of the Japanese in the Solomon Islands and New Guinea.

The battle was fought between the 4th and 8th May, 1942.It was the first sea battle between forces built around aircraft carriers and fought by aircraft rather than ships.

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I fear that things are about to get messy. Very few people appear to be able to what I call 'fractal up'. The patterns repeat and most continue to be obsessed with their political navel fluff, locked in and distracted by the tiny patterns and ripples that affect them directly... of course, that's what the New Gods of Mount Davos want as they pursue their demented, insane notions of TransHumanism with their lickspittle lackeys in Silicon Valley.

Stuff that would have been pure science fiction even just a scant few years back is all quite possible now, and I am fully convinced that if George Soros had the opportunity to have his brain kept alive in a bath of fresh stemcells harvested from late-term abortions and have it put into a robot body he would bloody well take it - it's gotta be worth tossing a few billion at, eh?

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I grew up in the era where Cancer was a word you never used unless it related to a star sign in the daily horoscopes. It was referred to as a euphemism - The Big C. As a Cancer survivor, I have learned to say the word and also to confront the cancers that pervade our society under the guise of " it is for our own good. "

Today, we are being invaded by the slow but ever persistent creeping wave of destruction that will inevitably overwhelm us. UNLESS we start to build some walls, push back and stop the incoming tide of cultural and societal corruption ( another " C " word we could do without ) we will be swamped and will drown in the incoming wave of the letter C out of control.

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Last week, we saw the passing of Judith Reisman, aged 86. Her death came 10 days after she received the second corona virus “ jab.” We will probably never know what her cause of death was, other than it was put down to natural causes. We will probably never know if it was a result of the vaccine or because she had existing health issues.

Or some other nepharious reason. 

But this, for the moment, is not the matter of her death that makes her extraordinary, but the matter of her life.

Judith Reisman was the woman who exposed the dark side of the man who is seen as a prophet and a devil, depending upon which side of the moral fence you sit. His name was Alfred Kinsey.

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As a kid, there was no room for sooks or cry babies. We played in the mud, we dropped food on the floor and picked it up and ate it. And, if we got hurt, our mother would shove some iodine on it, tell us to stop our moaning and go outside to play.

I remember when I was told, when having a tantrum or a hissy fit “ if you want to cry, I’ll give you something to cry about. “

We weren’t tougher back then. We just weren’t allowed to get away with shit.

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Here in Australia we don’t give much heed to what happens across the Tasman and mostly thoughts about the NZ in ANZAC come as an afterthought. Not that there is any malice in that. It’s simply a case of we never think about it. NZ is a tiny country compared to ourselves but they do have a habit of punching way above their weight. Of all of the allied nations in WW1 and WW2, NZ would be the flyweight if one thinks of sheer absolute numbers. The biggest contributor to WW2 was Russia by a large margin, then the USA, Britain, Canada and Australia.

If you look at it another way, in terms of giving most of what you have to give,as a proportion of their available manpower of military age, NZ was the biggest contributor to WW1 and second biggest to WW2.

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In 2017, Sonya Carson passed away aged 88. She was the mother of Dr Ben Carson, world-renowned neurosurgeon , writer, politician and man of faith. 

As Dr Carson said at the time of her death:

“All that I am is because of the love of my mother. She was one of God’s greatest blessings to me, and it was her foresight and discernment that pushed me to reach my dreams.”

So here is a story about a true America hero. Sonya Carson. Oh, and her son, Ben.

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When I feel sick or down in the dumps, I try and distract myself with something that is uplifting and cheerful  As William Shakespeare said so eloquently in " The Tempest " Misery makes strange bedfellows. " 

My old Gran used to tell me that misery loves company - in other words, don't feel sorry for yourself or you will end up surrounded by people and thoughts who make you feel even worse.

And so it does. If you feel miserable, it is often tempting to wallow in self pity and surround yourself with those who feel as shitty as you do. But often, you can find yourself in the company of people or thoughts that are in themselves the opposite to your frame of mind or circumstance. 

" Alas, the storm is come again! my best way is to creep under his gaberdine; there is no other shelter hereabouts: misery acquaints a man with strange bed-fellows. I will here shroud till the dregs of the storm be past. "

And so I turned my mind to something, somewhere , someone who could distract me until the storm passes and I feel more human again. I needed to seek the company of positivity when I am so tempted to feel downright miserable. 

And I came up with just the right tonic.

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Ming The Merciless was a nick name given to one of our most outstanding Australian military commanders of WW2.

His name was Lieutenant-General Sir Leslie Morshead. He was the Commanding Officer of the 9th Division of the 2nd AIF, Commander of the garrison of Tobruk during its period under siege from April to December, 1941, the chief Rat of Tobruk one might say, and still in command when the 9th got around the German defences to break the deadlock in the Battle of El Alamein in October, 1942.

He has been rightly described as “The Hero of Tobruk and Alamein”

His greatest achievements were against the German General Erwin Rommel, known as The Desert Fox but Morshead outfoxed him at every throw of the dice.

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We have just enjoyed an enormously successful month and our heartfelt thanks must go out to the posters that contributed to our Military Memory Month in the lead up to ANZAC Day.

As a site devoted to all things patriotic, I wanted to share my hopes and visions for our future and seek your feedback on what we hope to achieve.

What is Patriotism?

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The Biden-Boris green virus which infects most of the west has become a danger to Australia. PM Morrison has promised one billion dollars for “hydrogen, CCUS (carbon capture usage or storage), batteries and critical minerals - all to achieve “net zero”.

NOT ONE of these green dreams will produce one light-bulb of new energy – all will consume massive amounts of energy and money.

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It is the 25th April, and a German man and his wife from Munich are taking a motoring holiday to the South of France. They pass through the northern French city of Amiens. They observe much gaiety among the populace and are wondering what it is all about. 

They pass through the city and 15kms down the road they approach a small town. On the outskirts, they pass a cemetery which has a sign “Adelaide Cemetery”. 

Says the man, " that is not a French name. What does it mean? " 

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ANZAC Day has been sabotaged. Yet again. This time by quotas. Registrations and redtape.

I remember when it was a simple display of heartfelt patriotism and a love of the men and women who fell in service to our Nation. 

I remember when it was about standing at dawn on the morning of 25 April and honouring all those who fell because they were patriots. They fell for our way of life and our belief in freedom. 

Now we are being asked in many parts of Australia to register to honour our dead. Register? What idiocy is this? 

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Sydneys III, IV and V did not get the opportunity to show their true mettle as did numbers  I and II. After 1945 there were no more “real” wars that involved our country. There were UN peacekeeping operations and participation in conflicts undertaken by the Coalition of the Willing. Korea was officially dubbed a UN peacekeeping operation. Vietnam was a war between North & South Vietnam where our role was to support an ally, the USA in flushing out the Viet Cong.

Nevertheless to those who were taking part the bullets, bombs and shells were real and lethal regardless of the handle given to the conflict and whenever the call went out to give support to our allies our response as always was “Australia will be there!”

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I dedicate this article to the women who fought, died and tragically were lost. Alongside the brave men who did the same. I dedicate it to the women who kept the wheels turning on the farms and in the mines and in the factories and in the family homes.

There is great equality in life and in death. But nowhere as great as in the love we feel in our hearts.

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Over the past month, we have been reading articles from Happy Expat about our boys on the frontline. I have to hand it to him. It made me start to think again. 

The journey down the path of a road we never knew we wanted to explore but found ourselves walking down nonetheless.  We have marched side by side through the swamps and quagmires of our wartorn past and felt the bite of a thousand mosquitoes; dysentery and malnutrition. And these days, all we do is view it from the comfort of our heated or air-conditioned homes as part of a news story.

And we say, almost with an automatic response, Lest We Forget. Are we saying this because it rolls off the tongue? No meaning? Have we forgotten what these brave people did? 

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The Scrap Iron Flotilla was an Australian destroyer group that operated in the Mediterranean during WW2.

Its story is synonymous with the Rats of Tobruk. It was the means of supply to the beleaguered town under siege between 10th April, 1941 and 7th December, 1941.

Its name was conferred on it by Dr.Goebbels, the German propaganda minister intending to demean and undermine morale of the five Australian ships that made up the flotilla. As happened with the conferring of the name “Rats of Tobruk” on the garrison troops by Lord Haw Haw, instead of depressing morale it spurred them to greater acts of defiance. Neither understood the make-up of the Australian character.

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I would venture to say that the two most famous and well known phrases of our military history are “Gallipoli” and “The Rats of Tobruk”. One was a magnificent defeat. The other was a magnificent triumph.

Field Marshall Sir William Slim, 13th Governor General of Australia and at the time, General commanding the 14th Army said after the triumph over the Japanese at Milne Bay that “…..Some of us may forget that, of all the Allies, it was the Australians who first broke the invincibility of the Japanese army and it was the Australians who first broke the invincibility of the German army.”

In speaking of the defeat of the German Army he was speaking about Tobruk.

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I have just watched the funeral of Prince Philip. There was something so different, so sad and so moving that I felt the need to put it into words. To witness the passing of this great Naval Officer and servant of the People was and will become one of those moments in history where, as Shaydee wrote some time ago, we record our snapshots of momentous occasions and our brains realise that something momentous just occurred. 

Today, we watched the passing of the old guard. The handing over of our future to a group of people who have never learned that, without respect for the past,  we will be given a future that none of us could ever have imagined or ever wanted.

It is a future that fills me with dread.

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